Pensions and other social safety nets are unlikely to improve citizens’ attitudes toward historically violent regimes, recent research found, adding new empirical insights to a growing scholarly debate over whether such programs can indeed boost a government’s political support.

American politicians on both sides of the aisle have used post-traumatic stress disorder as a “strategic tool” through which to level sweeping criticism on the direction of U.S. foreign policy, a new study found, after staying mum on the subject for decades.

White Americans have grown less supportive of international trade over the past decade than racial minorities in the U.S. regardless of their economic status, a new study found, contrary to prevailing economic theories that suggest increased affluence leads to a less protectionist reaction to globalization.

Not every EU country plays by the same rules when it comes to asylum seekers. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
Not every EU country plays by the same rules when it comes to asylum seekers. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)Far-right parties in the European Union may be flouting the bloc’s standards for processing asylum seekers, according to new research that found nations reducing their claim approvals in a sign that the EU still struggles to enforce unified humanitarian protections.

U.S. presidents who use “presidential imagery” to appeal directly to voters appear to have little success actually marshaling public opinion in their favor, a recent case study found, even when such a strategy is used on state visits abroad that often draw wider press coverage than domestic events.

Unhappy people are more likely to back populist candidates in Europe. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
Unhappy people are more likely to back populist candidates in Europe. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)Individuals who aren’t happy are significantly more likely to back populist parties in Europe, according to new research, underscoring that political instability could be a result of policymakers not doing more to bolster citizens’ health and happiness.

The new U.S. presidential administration offers Iran a rare chance to bargain for the lifting of American sanctions, a researcher says, which would allow the Persian Gulf state to deepen economic ties to China, a key trading partner and ally, one of its “best” shots at reviving its ailing economy.

Multiculturalism can still be a touchy topic for white Americans. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
Multiculturalism can still be a touchy topic for white Americans. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)White Americans respond more positively to narratives about rising multiracialism in the U.S. than they do to the suggestion that the country is becoming a “majority-minority” society, new research shows, indicating that the way narratives around race and ethnicity are framed is “enormously influential” on broader attitudes toward diversity.

People tend to believe outsider candidates' promises of systemic reforms more than establishment candidates. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
People tend to believe outsider candidates' promises of systemic reforms more than establishment candidates. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)Two political economists have proposed a novel theoretical mechanism for understanding the appeal of outsider candidates, adding a valuable new approach to the rapidly growing body of scholarship around recent populist electoral victories.

There may be a link between political corruption and dividend payouts. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
There may be a link between political corruption and dividend payouts. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)Companies headquartered in U.S. states with higher levels of political corruption pay out more to investors through dividends and stock buybacks, according to new research by three Canadian academics.

Confucian cultures such as China's have handled COVID-19 better than others. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
Confucian cultures such as China's have handled COVID-19 better than others. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)Nations where East and South Asian cultures predominate have been “significantly better” than the rest of the world at preventing the spread of COVID-19, new research suggests, a finding that highlights potential cultural obstacles for Western policymakers scrambling to get the pandemic under control in their countries.

South Koreans are more likely to favor providing public assistance to women who flee North Korea than they do men, a new survey found, amid a growing influx of refugees and reduced government funding for resettlement.

Cities that make sudden cuts to their police forces could be inviting a lasting crime surge, new research suggests, with municipalities that lay off police officers in times of fiscal strain potentially trading public safety for a balanced budget.

Women who support European far-right parties typically don’t come from socially conservative or blue-collar backgrounds, unlike their male counterparts, according to new research, a finding that complicates prevailing narratives about how such parties appeal to the voting public.

Allegations from one of America’s two major political parties against the other may in fact backfire against both amid increased polarization, according to a recent paper, while benefiting politicians who stand accused.

Muslim Americans face greater distrust and prejudice in broader U.S. society on account of their religion than Arab Americans experience based on their ethnicity, even while they engage in quintessentially “American” forms of civic and political participation, new research suggests.

States relying on private prisons tend to hold prisoners longer. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
States relying on private prisons tend to hold prisoners longer. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)U.S. states that rely on private prisons incarcerate more people for longer periods of time, according to a first-of-its-kind study that establishes a causal connection between private prisons and incarceration.

Raising spending limits on political campaigns has cut down on electoral competition and amplified the advantages of incumbents in the UK, according to new research, and could also impact election dynamics in democracies around the world.

Counterterrorism officials in Canada still routinely ignore factors related to gender and race when analyzing suspects, a researcher found, leaving “persistent blind spots” in their search for violent extremists, especially those who target women and minorities.

U.S. Senate candidates stand to gain an edge by shunning their party’s sitting president if they’re running for office in a state where opposition voters are clustered, according to new research.